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Journal of Medical Humanities

, 30:209 | Cite as

The Medical Humanities: Toward a Renewed Praxis

  • Delese WearEmail author
Article

Abstract

In this essay, I explore medical humanities practice in the United States with descriptions offered by fifteen faculty members who participated in an electronic survey. The questions posed focused on the desirability of a core humanities curriculum in medical education; on the knowledge, skills, and values that are found in such a curriculum; and on who should teach medical humanities and make curriculum decisions regarding content and placement. I conclude with a call for a renewed interdisciplinarity in the medical humanities and a move away from the territorial aspects of disciplinary knowledge and methods sometimes found in medical humanities practice.

Keywords

Medical humanities Medical curriculum Interdisciplinary teaching Interdisciplinary curriculum 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northeastern Ohio UniversitiesCollege of MedicineRootstownUSA

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