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“Diabetes and Literacy: Negotiating Control Through Artifacts of Medicalization”

Article

Abstract

My experience with the California Department of Motor Vehicles offers a case to explore how bureaucratic institutions monitor, classify, and control individuals. By examining artifacts created for and used by the DMV through the lens of literacy studies, I discuss the variety of rhetorical strategies used in each document and the effects and implications of those strategies, for example on subjectivity or identity, and move beyond the language of the artifacts themselves to attend to how they are invested with power in the management and control of populations.

Keywords

Literacy Sponsorship Diabetes Bureaucratic control Agency 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EnglishCalifornia State University, ChicoChicoUSA

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