Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 245–251 | Cite as

Medical Education for Social Justice: Paulo Freire Revisited

  • Sayantani DasGupta
  • Alice Fornari
  • Kamini Geer
  • Louisa Hahn
  • Vanita Kumar
  • Hyun Joon Lee
  • Susan Rubin
  • Marji Gold
Original Paper

Abstract

Although social justice is an integral component of medical professionalism, there is little discussion in medical education about how to teach it to future physicians. Using adult learning theory and the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, medical educators can teach a socially-conscious professionalism through educational content and teaching strategies. Such teaching can model non-hierarchical relationships to learners, which can translate to their clinical interactions with patients. Freirian teaching can additionally foster professionalism in both teachers and learners by ensuring that they are involved citizens in their local, national and international communities.

Keywords

Professionalism Social justice Medical education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sayantani DasGupta
    • 1
  • Alice Fornari
    • 2
  • Kamini Geer
    • 2
  • Louisa Hahn
    • 2
  • Vanita Kumar
    • 2
  • Hyun Joon Lee
    • 2
  • Susan Rubin
    • 2
  • Marji Gold
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of General PediatricsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.The Albert Edison College of MedicineYeshiva University, BronxNew YorkUSA

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