Innate Immune Cells in Breast Cancer – From Villains to Heroes?

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10911-011-9224-2

Cite this article as:
Kees, T. & Egeblad, M. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia (2011) 16: 189. doi:10.1007/s10911-011-9224-2

Abstract

The innate immune system ensures effective protection against foreign pathogens and plays important roles in tissue remodeling. There are many types of innate immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, these cells accumulate in most solid tumors, including those of the breast. There, they play a tumor-promoting role through secretion of growth and angiogenic factors, as well as immunosuppressive molecules. This is in strong contrast to the tumor-suppressing effects that innate immune cells exert in vitro upon proper activation. Therapeutic approaches have been developed with the aim of achieving similar suppressive activities in vivo. However, multiple factors in the tumor microenvironment, many of which are immunosuppressive, represent a major obstacle to effective treatment. Here, we discuss the potential of combating breast cancer through activation of the innate immune system, including possible strategies to enhance the success of immunotherapy.

Keywords

Innate immune cells Immunotherapy Macrophages Tumor microenvironment Tumor-suppressing immune activities 

List of Abbreviations

BCG

Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

CD

cluster of differentiation

CSF-1

colony stimulating factor-1

DC

dendritic cell

EGF

epidermal growth factor

FasL

Fas ligand

FGF

fibroblast growth factor

GM-CSF

granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor

HER2

human epidermal growth factor receptor 2

HMGB-1

high mobility group box protein-1

HSP

heat shock protein

IFN

interferon

IL

interleukin

LAIR

leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor

LPS

lipopolysaccharide

MDSC

myeloid derived suppressor cells

MMP

matrix metalloproteinase

NK cell

natural killer cell

NLR

nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-containing protein like receptor

NO

nitric oxide

PAMP

pathogen associated molecular pattern

PDL1

programmed cell death receptor ligand

ROS

reactive oxygen species

SR/CR

spontaneous regression/complete resistance

STAT

signal transducer and activator of transcription

TAM

tumor associated macrophage

TGF-β

transforming growth factor-β

Th1

type I T helper cell

Th2

type II T helper cell

TLR

toll-like receptor

TNF-α

tumor necrosis factor-α

TRAIL

TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand

Treg

regulatory T cell

VEGF

vascular endothelial growth factor

ZA

zoledronic acid

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cold Spring Harbor LaboratoryCold Spring HarborUSA

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