microRNAs and EMT in Mammary Cells and Breast Cancer

  • Josephine A. Wright
  • Jennifer K. Richer
  • Gregory J. Goodall
Article

Abstract

MicroRNAs are master regulators of gene expression in many biological and pathological processes, including mammary gland development and breast cancer. The differentiation program termed the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) involves changes in a number of microRNAs. Some of these microRNAs have been shown to control cellular plasticity through the suppression of EMT-inducers or to influence cellular phenotype through the suppression of genes involved in defining the epithelial and mesenchymal cell states. This has led to the suggestion that microRNAs maybe a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss microRNAs that are involved in EMT in mammary cells and breast cancer.

Keywords

microRNA epithelial to mesenchymal transition mammary cells breast cancer 

Abbreviations

miRNA

microRNA

EMT

epithelial to mesenchymal transition

MET

mesenchymal to epithelial transition

TGF-β

Transforming Growth Factor β

HMEC

human mammary epithelial cell

bCSC

breast cancer stem cell

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josephine A. Wright
    • 1
  • Jennifer K. Richer
    • 2
  • Gregory J. Goodall
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Cancer BiologySA PathologyAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of ColoradoAuroraUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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