Journal of Low Temperature Physics

, Volume 184, Issue 3–4, pp 634–641

Advanced ACTPol Multichroic Polarimeter Array Fabrication Process for 150 mm Wafers

  • S. M. Duff
  • J. Austermann
  • J. A. Beall
  • D. Becker
  • R. Datta
  • P. A. Gallardo
  • S. W. Henderson
  • G. C. Hilton
  • S. P. Ho
  • J. Hubmayr
  • B. J. Koopman
  • D. Li
  • J. McMahon
  • F. Nati
  • M. D. Niemack
  • C. G. Pappas
  • M. Salatino
  • B. L. Schmitt
  • S. M. Simon
  • S. T. Staggs
  • J. R. Stevens
  • J. Van Lanen
  • E. M. Vavagiakis
  • J. T. Ward
  • E. J. Wollack
Article
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Abstract

Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is a third-generation cosmic microwave background receiver to be deployed in 2016 on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). Spanning five frequency bands from 25 to 280 GHz and having just over 5600 transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers, this receiver will exhibit increased sensitivity and mapping speed compared to previously fielded ACT instruments. This paper presents the fabrication processes developed by NIST to scale to large arrays of feedhorn-coupled multichroic AlMn-based TES polarimeters on 150-mm diameter wafers. In addition to describing the streamlined fabrication process which enables high yields of densely packed detectors across larger wafers, we report the details of process improvements for sensor (AlMn) and insulator (SiN\(_x\)) materials and microwave structures, and the resulting performance improvements.

Keywords

AlMn Multichroic Polarimeter SiN\(_x\) Transition-edge sensor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Duff
    • 1
  • J. Austermann
    • 1
  • J. A. Beall
    • 1
  • D. Becker
    • 1
  • R. Datta
    • 2
  • P. A. Gallardo
    • 3
  • S. W. Henderson
    • 3
  • G. C. Hilton
    • 1
  • S. P. Ho
    • 4
  • J. Hubmayr
    • 1
  • B. J. Koopman
    • 3
  • D. Li
    • 5
  • J. McMahon
    • 2
  • F. Nati
    • 6
  • M. D. Niemack
    • 3
  • C. G. Pappas
    • 4
  • M. Salatino
    • 4
  • B. L. Schmitt
    • 6
  • S. M. Simon
    • 4
  • S. T. Staggs
    • 4
  • J. R. Stevens
    • 3
  • J. Van Lanen
    • 1
  • E. M. Vavagiakis
    • 3
  • J. T. Ward
    • 6
  • E. J. Wollack
    • 7
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Astrophysical SciencesPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA
  5. 5.SLAC National Accelerator LaboratoryMenlo ParkUSA
  6. 6.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  7. 7.NASA Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbeltUSA

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