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Journal of Insect Behavior

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 405–413 | Cite as

Prelude to a Kiss: Evidence for Mate Discrimination in the Striped Bark Scorpion, Centruroides vittatus

  • Clarissa J. Nobile
  • Philip M. Johns
Article

Abstract

The scorpion, Centruroides vittatus, lives in groups, which may allow females to discriminate among mates. We examine possible female mate discrimination based on the duration of the “kiss” phase of courtship, during which sperm is transferred, and on the duration of the “promenade a deux” phase of courtship that precedes sperm transfer. Larger males spent less time during the promenade and more time during the kiss phases of courtship. We discuss the implications of this to sexual selection in scorpions.

Keywords

mate discrimination scorpion courtship behavior promenade a deux Centruroides vittatus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesColumbia UniversityNew York
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of MarylandCollege Park

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