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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 44–49 | Cite as

Noncommunicable Diseases Among Syrian Refugees in Turkey: An Emerging Problem for a Vulnerable Group

  • Mehmet Ali Eryurt
  • Mevlüde Gül MenetEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Turkey hosts 3.6 million Syrian refugees, which is the highest number of refugees in a single country worldwide. In this study, we examined the status of noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors among Syrian refugees in Turkey. The data for the study come from the 2016 Health Status Survey of Syrian Refugees in Turkey. We used logistic regression and descriptive statistics to analyze four major noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors to assess the health status of Syrians under temporary protection in Turkey. Combined risk factor analysis showed that, as age increases, the risk of having a noncommunicable disease increases: Syrians in Turkey 60–69 years old have the highest risk of noncommunicable diseases followed by those 45–59 years old. Men have a higher risk of noncommunicable diseases than women. The noncommunicable disease status of Syrians in Turkey should be considered given the high economic burden of treatment and the potential length of stay of Syrians in Turkey.

Keywords

Noncommunicable diseases Turkey Syrian refugees Temporary protection 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interests to specify.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Demography, Institute of Population StudiesHacettepe UniversityAnkaraTurkey

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