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Determinants of Parenting Practices Related to Monitoring Sugar Sweetened Beverages Among Hispanic Mothers

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate Hispanic mothers (n = 238) of 2–5 year old children and determinants of their monitoring practices related to their preschooler’s consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Hispanic mothers were recruited from numerous areas (i.e. churches, community agencies, and daycares) in southwest Oklahoma City. Constructs of the Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) were evaluated along with demographic questions. Most mothers (92%) were born outside the US, and a majority had been in the US ≥ 11 years (61%). The RAA constructs autonomy, capacity (or self-efficacy), and descriptive norms predicted a significant amount of the variance of SSB monitoring practices (14.7%). Results show that public health interventions that promote maternal monitoring practices related to SSB for Hispanic mothers should focus on promoting capacity, autonomy, and norms. Such interventions can take place in community centers, clinics, and day cares.

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Acknowledgements

Funding for this study was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U54GM104938 to the Oklahoma Share Clinical and Translational Resources (Dr. Lora, Pilot Project Awardee). The study sponsor did not have a role in the study design, collection and analysis of data, interpretation of findings, or manuscript writing.

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Correspondence to Paul Branscum.

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Branscum, P., Lora, K. Determinants of Parenting Practices Related to Monitoring Sugar Sweetened Beverages Among Hispanic Mothers. J Immigrant Minority Health 22, 120–125 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903-019-00875-9

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Keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • Hispanic health
  • Health disparities
  • Reasoned Action Approach