Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 553–558 | Cite as

Community Health Center Access to Resources for their Patients with Diabetes

  • Arshiya A. Baig
  • Cara A. Locklin
  • Amanda Campbell
  • Cynthia T. Schaefer
  • Loretta J. Heuer
  • Sang Mee Lee
  • Marla C. Solomon
  • Michael T. Quinn
  • J. Martin Vargas
  • Deborah L. Burnet
  • Marshall H. Chin
Brief Communication
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Abstract

Community health center providers and staff access to resources for their Latino and non-Latino patients with diabetes is unknown. We analyzed survey data from 577 community health center providers and staff who manage diabetes from 85 sites across 10 Midwestern states. Respondents were labeled as high proportion (HP) providers if >25 % of their site’s diabetes population was Latino. HP providers were more likely than non-HP providers to have access to physician’s assistants (71 vs. 58 %) and certified diabetes educators (61 vs. 51 %), but less access to endocrinologists (25 vs. 35 %) (p < 0.05). HP providers had greater access to Spanish-speaking providers (48 vs. 26 %), on-site interpreters (83 vs. 59 %), culturally tailored diabetes education programs (64 vs. 26 %), and community outreach programs (77 vs. 52 %) (p < 0.05). Providers at HP sites reported greater access to a range of personnel and culturally tailored programs. However, increased access to these services is needed across all sites.

Keywords

Diabetes Latino Services Community health centers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arshiya A. Baig
    • 1
  • Cara A. Locklin
    • 2
  • Amanda Campbell
    • 3
  • Cynthia T. Schaefer
    • 3
    • 4
  • Loretta J. Heuer
    • 3
    • 5
  • Sang Mee Lee
    • 6
  • Marla C. Solomon
    • 7
  • Michael T. Quinn
    • 1
  • J. Martin Vargas
    • 8
  • Deborah L. Burnet
    • 1
  • Marshall H. Chin
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of MedicineUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.College of NursingUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.MidWest Clinicians’ NetworkLansingUSA
  4. 4.University of EvansvilleEvansvilleUSA
  5. 5.North Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA
  6. 6.Department of Health StudiesUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Department of Pediatric EndocrinologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Community Action Partnership of Western NebraskaGeringUSA

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