Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 747–757

Knowledge and Acceptability of the HPV Vaccine Among Ethnically Diverse Black Women

  • Rula Wilson
  • Diane R. Brown
  • Makini A. S. Boothe
  • Caroline E. S. Harris
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine HPV vaccine knowledge and acceptability among ethnically diverse Black women. Forty-four women were interviewed in 6 focus groups (2 African American, 2 English-speaking Caribbean, 1 Haitian, and 1 African). Thematic content analysis was used to generate common concepts and themes and to compare findings across groups. There was varied but limited knowledge and confusion across ethnic groups about the HPV infection and vaccine. African and Haitian women had the least knowledge. Overall, women were generally receptive toward the HPV vaccine for girls but unclear about the need to vaccinate boys. Concerns about the HPV vaccine were mainly related to side effects/safety and vaccinating children at a young age. Healthcare provider’s recommendation of the vaccination was important for decision making. Educational interventions with Black women about HPV vaccination should recognize cultural beliefs that vary by ethnic group.

Keywords

Human papillomavirus (HPV) Cancer prevention Black women Health disparities Ethnicity 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rula Wilson
    • 1
  • Diane R. Brown
    • 2
  • Makini A. S. Boothe
    • 3
  • Caroline E. S. Harris
    • 2
  1. 1.School of NursingUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNewarkUSA
  2. 2.School of Public HealthUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNewarkUSA
  3. 3.School of Public Health, Institute for the Elimination of Health DisparitiesUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyNewarkUSA

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