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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 510–516 | Cite as

Is Acculturation Always Adverse to Korean Immigrant Health in the United States?

  • Chaelin Karen Ra
  • Youngtae ChoEmail author
  • Robert A. Hummer
Original Paper

Abstract

This study examined the association between individuals’ proportion of life spent in the United States and the health status and health behaviors among Korean immigrants aged 25 and above. The analysis is stratified by level of education to test whether a higher proportion of time spent in the United States is associated with poorer health among both less educated and highly educated Korean immigrants. California health interview survey data from 2005 to 2007 were used to estimate logistic regression models of health and health behaviour among Korean immigrants, stratified by educational attainment. The health and health behaviour of less educated Korean immigrants tended to be worse among those with a higher proportion of residence in the United States. However, more highly educated Korean immigrants tended to exhibit lower odds of being unhealthy and lower odds of poor health behavior with a higher proportion of life spent in the United States. Acculturation is not always associated with poorer immigrant health outcomes. A higher proportion of life spent in the United States tends to be associated with more favorable health and health behavior among highly educated Korean immigrants.

Keywords

Acculturation Segmented assimilation Immigrant health Korean immigrants Education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chaelin Karen Ra
    • 1
  • Youngtae Cho
    • 1
    Email author
  • Robert A. Hummer
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Public HealthSeoul National UniversityKwanak-gu, SeoulKorea
  2. 2.Population Research CenterThe University of Texas-AustinAustinUSA

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