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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 909–914 | Cite as

Prevalence and Associated Factors for Chlamydia trachomatis Infection Among Undocumented Immigrants in a Primary Care Facility in Geneva, Switzerland: A Cross-Sectional Study

  • Yves JacksonEmail author
  • Paul Sebo
  • Gaelle Aeby
  • Patrick Bovier
  • Beatrice Ninet
  • Jacques Schrenzel
  • Philippe Sudre
  • Dagmar Haller
  • Jean-Michel Gaspoz
  • Hans Wolff
Original Paper

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis infection (CTI) is the most frequent sexually transmitted infection in western countries. Its prevalence in undocumented immigrants, a rapidly growing vulnerable population, remains unknown. We aimed to document the prevalence of CTI and associated factors at the primary health care level. This cross-sectional study included all undocumented immigrants attending a health care facility in Geneva, Switzerland. Participants completed a questionnaire and were tested for CTI by PCR assay. Three-hundred thirteen undocumented immigrants (68.4% female, mean age 32.4 (SD 8) years) agreed to participate. CTI prevalence was 5.8% (95% CI 3.3–8.4). Factors associated with higher prevalence were age ≤25 (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.3–12.2) and having had two or more sexual partners during the precedent year (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.5–13.7). Prevalence and associated factors for infection in this vulnerable population were comparable with other populations in Western countries. Our findings support the importance of facilitating access to existing screening opportunities in particular to individuals at higher risk.

Keywords

Chlamydia trachomatis Sexually transmitted infection Undocumented immigrants 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Marylise Holst, Odile Colombel-Musset, Heidi Fowler-Njie, Martine Locatelli, Tina Mazzocato, Edith Meriaux, for their precious collaboration and support. This study was supported by institutional grants from the Geneva University Hospitals (R&D fund) and from the Department of Health and Community Medicine, University of Geneva and the General directorate of health, Department of economy and health, Geneva Canton.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yves Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Paul Sebo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gaelle Aeby
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrick Bovier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Beatrice Ninet
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jacques Schrenzel
    • 2
    • 3
  • Philippe Sudre
    • 4
  • Dagmar Haller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jean-Michel Gaspoz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hans Wolff
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Community Medicine and Primary CareGeneva University HospitalsGeneva 14Switzerland
  2. 2.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine, Service of Infectious DiseasesGeneva University HospitalsGenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.Department of Economy and HealthGeneral Directorate of HealthGeneva CantonSwitzerland

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