Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 423–432

Correlates of Bacterial Pneumonia Hospitalizations in Elders, Texas Border

  • Frank C. Lemus
  • Alai Tan
  • Karl Eschbach
  • Daniel H. FreemanJr.
  • Jean L. Freeman
Original Paper

Abstract

Background Immunization preventable bacterial pneumonia is an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) prevention quality indicator of health care. This study explored associations of individual and county correlates with bacterial pneumonia hospitalization rates for elders residing in 32 Texas counties bordering Mexico. Methods We estimated baseline rates from Texas Health Care Information Collection’s hospital discharge data for 1999–2001, and population counts from the 2000 U.S. Census. Results The rate among the total Texas border population was 500/10,000, three times the national rate. Elders 75+, males, and Latinos had the highest rates. An increase of 1 primary care physician per 1000 population is associated with a decrease in pneumonia-related hospitalization rates by 33%, while each 10% increase in Latinos is associated with a 0.1% rate increase. Discussion This baseline bacterial pneumonia hospitalization study demonstrates a systematic approach to estimate county rates, a process that could lead to improved outcomes through effective community interventions. Methodology demonstrates how publicly available hospital discharge data can be used by communities to better measure and improve quality of health care.

Keywords

Bacterial pneumonia hospitalizations Texas–Mexico border Elderly Racial disparities Health Services Research Prevention quality indicators Community Based Participatory Research Residence characteristics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank C. Lemus
    • 1
  • Alai Tan
    • 2
  • Karl Eschbach
    • 3
  • Daniel H. FreemanJr.
    • 4
  • Jean L. Freeman
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Sealy Center on AgingThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community HealthThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Demography and Organizational Studies, Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic Research, Texas State Data CenterThe University of Texas at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  4. 4.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Office of Biostatistics, Division of Rehabilitation SciencesThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA
  5. 5.Departments of Preventive Medicine & Community Health and Internal Medicine, Sealy Center on AgingThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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