Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp 366–371

Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in US-Born Latin and Caribbean Youth

  • Sarah E. Messiah
  • Adriana Carrillo-Iregui
  • Nayely Garibay-Nieto
  • Gabriela Lopez-Mitnik
  • Sissi Cossio
  • Kristopher L. Arheart
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10903-008-9219-2

Cite this article as:
Messiah, S.E., Carrillo-Iregui, A., Garibay-Nieto, N. et al. J Immigrant Minority Health (2009) 11: 366. doi:10.1007/s10903-008-9219-2

Abstract

Background Little is knows about the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) among overweight first or second generation United States immigrant children/adolescents from Central/South America and the Caribbean basin. Methods Analysis of anthropometric and laboratory data (N = 224) in overweight children ages 3–18 (64% Hispanic, 25% AfroCaribbean/black, 8% white, 3% multiracial) was conducted. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of individual parameters of MS and the MS (defined as ≥3 abnormal components). Results The prevalence of the MS was 29% for the overall sample; an additional 28% had two MS components. Boys were significantly more likely than girls to have abnormal systolic blood pressure (P < 0.05). Hispanics were significantly more likely than blacks to have abnormal triglyceride and HDL cholesterol (P < 0.01 for both comparisons). Conclusions Our results indicate that both sub-groups of, and major ethnic groups (Mexican- and African American) are at equal risk for cardiometabolic disease. Early identification of MS in recent immigrant children may improve their future cardiometabolic health.

Keywords

Obesity Metabolic syndrome Minority Adolescent Children 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah E. Messiah
    • 1
  • Adriana Carrillo-Iregui
    • 2
  • Nayely Garibay-Nieto
    • 2
  • Gabriela Lopez-Mitnik
    • 1
  • Sissi Cossio
    • 2
  • Kristopher L. Arheart
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Clinical ResearchUniversity of Miami, Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric EndocrinologyUniversity of Miami, Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthUniversity of Miami, Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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