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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 206–214 | Cite as

The Impact of Immigration Status on Tobacco Use among Chinese-American Adults in Texas

  • Shaohua  S. HuEmail author
  • Unto E.  Pallonen
  • Angela F.  Meshack
Original Paper

Abstract

Objectives This study analyzed the impact of immigration status on current tobacco use among adult Chinese-Americans living in Texas. Methods A survey was administered in Chinese and English in 2004 to assess tobacco use among Chinese-American adults using a stratified probability sample from two large metropolitan areas in Texas. Data were adjusted for unequal probability of selection and weighted to provide state-wide estimates for Chinese-Americans in Texas. Results The study sample was comprised of 1,054 Chinese-American adults. The overall current smoking rate was 11.1% with men’s rates much higher (16.1%) than women’s (6.7%). Lower household income and education increased smoking among males but more educated females had a tendency to smoke more. Although overall smoking rate among Chinese-Americans was significantly lower than the general Texas population (20.6%), smoking rate among recent immigrant men (<5 years in the U.S.) was alarmingly higher (28.0%). U.S.-born Chinese-American men’s smoking rate (25.0%) is similar to that of their U.S.-born counterparts (23.7%). U.S.-born Chinese-American men initiated smoking 4 years earlier (13.8 years) than their immigrant counterparts. Conclusions Although Chinese-Americans in Texas had overall lower smoking rates than the general population, the high smoking rates among recently immigrated men emphasize the need for cessation activities targeting this group.

Keywords

Immigration Chinese-American Surveys Tobacco use 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Drs. Moon Chen and Janice Tsoh for providing their expertise and experience in developing the survey instrument; Ms. Jing Peng, Ms. Yuerong Wen, Ms. Hongyu Zou, Ms. Xiaoyi Liu, Ms. Xia Chang, Ms. Connie Wang, and Ms. Xuemei Luo for their contributions toward data collection and entry. Special thanks also to Mr. Brian Howard for his input on implementation and reporting. This research was funded by the FY 2003–2005 Minority Health Research and Education Grant Program (MT05) of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shaohua  S. Hu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Unto E.  Pallonen
    • 2
  • Angela F.  Meshack
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Adult and Community HealthCenter for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA

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