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Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 1575–1591 | Cite as

Processes Underlying Links to Subjective Well-being: Material Concerns, Autonomy, and Personality

  • Weiting NgEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

This study explored the mediating processes underlying the associations between autonomy and subjective well-being (SWB), and those between personality and affective well-being. Using the World Values Survey dataset from Singapore, the results showed that autonomy and financial satisfaction were the strongest predictors of life satisfaction and happiness, whereas personality traits were the strongest predictors of positive feelings. Both personality and material concerns predicted negative feelings to some extent. Mediation analyses showed that the associations between autonomy and SWB, and those between personality and positive and negative emotions were mediated by material concerns. Thus, this study illustrates the process models of different SWB facets (life satisfaction, happiness, positive and negative emotions) and highlights that dispositional factors (extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, and autonomy) can exert both direct and indirect effects (via material factors) on SWB.

Keywords

Autonomy Mediating effects Subjective well-being Personality Financial satisfaction Material concerns 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Arts and Social SciencesSIM UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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