Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 5, pp 1185–1210 | Cite as

Fragility of Happiness Beliefs Across 15 National Groups

  • Mohsen Joshanloo
  • Dan Weijers
  • Ding-Yu Jiang
  • Gyuseog Han
  • Jaechang Bae
  • Joyce S. Pang
  • Lok Sang Ho
  • Maria Cristina Ferreira
  • Melikşah Demir
  • Muhammad Rizwan
  • Imran Ahmed Khilji
  • Mustapha Achoui
  • Ryosuke Asano
  • Tasuku Igarashi
  • Saori Tsukamoto
  • Sanne M. A. Lamers
  • Yücel Turan
  • Suresh Sundaram
  • Victoria Wai Lan Yeung
  • Wai-Ching Poon
  • Zarina Kh. Lepshokova
  • Tatiana Panyusheva
  • Amerkhanova Natalia
Research Paper

Abstract

The belief that happiness is fragile—that it is fleeting and may easily turn into less favourable states—is common across individuals and cultures. However, not much is known about this belief domain and its structure and correlates. In the present study, we use multigroup confirmatory factor analysis and multilevel modelling to investigate the measurement invariance, cross-level isomorphism, predictive validity, and nomological network of the fragility of happiness scale across 15 nations. The results show that this scale has good statistical properties at both individual and cultural levels, and is associated with relevant psycho-social concepts in expected directions. The importance of the results, limitations, and potential directions for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Fragility of happiness Happiness Well-being Culture Fear of happiness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohsen Joshanloo
    • 1
  • Dan Weijers
    • 2
  • Ding-Yu Jiang
    • 3
  • Gyuseog Han
    • 4
  • Jaechang Bae
    • 4
  • Joyce S. Pang
    • 5
  • Lok Sang Ho
    • 6
  • Maria Cristina Ferreira
    • 7
  • Melikşah Demir
    • 8
  • Muhammad Rizwan
    • 9
  • Imran Ahmed Khilji
    • 9
  • Mustapha Achoui
    • 10
  • Ryosuke Asano
    • 11
  • Tasuku Igarashi
    • 11
  • Saori Tsukamoto
    • 11
  • Sanne M. A. Lamers
    • 12
  • Yücel Turan
    • 12
  • Suresh Sundaram
    • 13
  • Victoria Wai Lan Yeung
    • 6
  • Wai-Ching Poon
    • 14
  • Zarina Kh. Lepshokova
    • 15
  • Tatiana Panyusheva
    • 15
  • Amerkhanova Natalia
    • 15
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuSouth Korea
  2. 2.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  3. 3.National Chung Cheng UniversityChia-YiTaiwan
  4. 4.Chonnam National UniversityGwangjuSouth Korea
  5. 5.Nanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  6. 6.Lingnan UniversityHong KongChina
  7. 7.Salgado de Oliveira UniversityRio de JaneiroBrazil
  8. 8.Northern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA
  9. 9.University of KarachiKarachiPakistan
  10. 10.Arab Open UniversityKuwaitKuwait
  11. 11.Nagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  12. 12.University of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands
  13. 13.Annamalai UniversityAnnamalainagarIndia
  14. 14.Monash UniversitySelangorMalaysia
  15. 15.National Research University Higher School of EconomicsMoscowRussia

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