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Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 979–994 | Cite as

Psychological Capital Among University Students: Relationships with Study Engagement and Intrinsic Motivation

  • Oi Ling SiuEmail author
  • Arnold B. Bakker
  • Xinhui Jiang
Research Paper

Abstract

This paper reports two studies: Study 1 aimed to evaluate respective modified versions of existing scales of psychological capital (PsyCap) and study engagement (SE), and to test the reciprocal relationship between PsyCap and SE; Study 2 aimed to test intrinsic motivation as a mediator between PsyCap and SE. A two-wave cross-lagged design was adopted in Study 1 with a matched sample of 103 students, with 4 months apart. With confirmatory factor analyses, the results supported the construct validity of a higher-order model of PsyCap (PsyCap overall) and of study engagement comprising dedication, absorption and vigor. Further, the reciprocal relationship between PsyCap and SE was demonstrated. Results of Study 2 among 100 university students showed that intrinsic motivation measured at time 2 was a significant mediator between time 1 PsyCap and time 2 SE.

Keywords

Cross-lagged analysis Psychological capital Study engagement Intrinsic motivation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by Teaching Development Grants by Lingnan University, Hong Kong (TG09A7, TG10B4).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social PolicyLingnan UniversityTuen MunHong Kong
  2. 2.Erasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Yunnan University of Finance and EconomicsKunmingPeople’s Republic of China

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