Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 205–223 | Cite as

Flow Experience, Culture, and Well-being: How Do Autotelic Japanese College Students Feel, Behave, and Think in Their Daily Lives?

Research Paper

Abstract

This study attempted to show how autotelic people who live in a non-Western culture feel, behave, and think in their daily lives. Using a sample of 315 Japanese college students, a series of correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of flow experience as an indicator of autotelic personality and a broad range of well-being measures. A distribution analysis revealed that on average Japanese college students experienced flow more than a “few times a year,” but less than “once a month.” In the examination of relations between flow and well-being measures, autotelic Japanese college students, or those who experienced flow more often in their daily lives, were more likely to show higher self-esteem and lower anxiety, use active coping strategies more often and use passive coping strategies less often, as compared to their less autotelic counterparts. They were more likely to report active commitments to college life, search for future career, and daily activities in general. They also reported more Jujitsu-kan, a Japanese sense of fulfillment, and greater satisfaction with their lives. Implications of these findings are discussed in terms of what experiencing flow means and what effects flow potentially has for college students in a non-Western culture.

Keywords

Flow experience Autotelic personality Culture Well-being Japanese college students 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to thank Dr. Mihly Csikszentmihaly, Dr. Jeanne Nakamura, and Ms. Loren Bryant for their helpful comments and advice on earlier versions of this article.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Intercultural CommunicationHosei UniversityChiyoda-ku, TokyoJapan

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