Journal of Happiness Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 185–196

Increasing well-being through teaching goal-setting and planning skills: results of a brief intervention

  • Andrew K. MacLeod
  • Emma Coates
  • Jacquie Hetherton
Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10902-007-9057-2

Cite this article as:
MacLeod, A.K., Coates, E. & Hetherton, J. J Happiness Stud (2008) 9: 185. doi:10.1007/s10902-007-9057-2

Abstract

Many factors are known to be associated with psychological well-being. However, it is much less clear whether those factors actually cause well-being and, hence, whether there is any practical value in trying to manipulate those factors to increase well-being. The proposed study addresses both the theoretical and practical issues by testing the effectiveness of an empirically-derived, brief psychological intervention to increase well-being in a non-clinical, unselected sample. The intervention focused on developing goal setting and planning (GAP) skills, which are known to be linked to well-being, potentially have widespread effects, and are amenable to intervention. Within a quasi-experimental design, participants received three, 1-h, group sessions (Study 1) or completed the programme individually in their own time (Study 2). Those taking part in the intervention, both individually and in a group, showed significant increases in subjective well-being, compared to their respective control groups not receiving the intervention. The results provide preliminary support for the view that (a) goal setting and planning skills have a causal link to subjective well-being and (b) that such skills can be learned to enhance well-being.

Keywords

Well-being Intervention Goal-setting Planning 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew K. MacLeod
    • 1
  • Emma Coates
    • 1
  • Jacquie Hetherton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyRoyal Holloway, University of LondonEgham, SurreyUK

Personalised recommendations