Journal of Community Health

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 289–295 | Cite as

A Novel Public Library-Based Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Program for Younger High-Risk Groups in Omaha, Nebraska, USA

  • Shirley F. Delair
  • Elizabeth R. Lyden
  • Anne L. O’Keefe
  • Kari A. Simonsen
  • Sherri R. Nared
  • Elizabeth A. Berthold
  • Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway
Original Paper

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) are the two most commonly reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the United States (U.S.) and Douglas County, Nebraska has STI rates consistently above the U.S. average. The Douglas County Health Department (DCHD) developed an outreach CT and NG screening program in public libraries to address the problem beyond the traditional STI clinic setting. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the program and identifies factors predictive of CT and NG infections. A retrospective review of surveys of library patrons and DCHD traditional STI clinic clients who submitted urine tests for CT and NG from June 2010 through April 2014 was done. Chi square, Fisher exact, Student’s t tests, univariate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. A total of 977 library records and 4871 DCHD clinic records were reviewed. The percent positive was lower in the library than in the traditional clinic for CT (9.9 vs. 11.2 %) and NG (2.74 vs. 5.3 %) (p = 0.039 and p < 0.001, respectively). Library clients were more likely to be 19 years and younger (OR 6.14, 95 % CI: 5.0, 7.5), Black (OR 3.4, 95 % CI: 2.8, 4.1), and asymptomatic (OR 12.4, 95 % CI: 9.9, 15.5) compared to traditional clinic clients. The library STI screening program effectively reaches a younger, asymptomatic, and predominantly Black population compared to a traditional health department clinic site.

Keywords

Chlamydia trachomatis Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sexually transmitted infections Sexual health Health disparity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha, Nebraska and their STI prevention staff for their assistance in completing this project. We would like to thank Kate Rieke, M.A., M.P.H., for proofreading our manuscript.

Funding Statement

This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shirley F. Delair
    • 1
  • Elizabeth R. Lyden
    • 2
  • Anne L. O’Keefe
    • 3
  • Kari A. Simonsen
    • 1
  • Sherri R. Nared
    • 3
  • Elizabeth A. Berthold
    • 3
  • Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of PediatricsUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsCollege of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  3. 3.Douglas County Health DepartmentOmahaUSA
  4. 4.Department of EpidemiologyCollege of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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