Journal of Community Health

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 673–679

Factors Influencing Colorectal Cancer Screening in Low-Income African Americans in Tennessee

  • Kushal Patel
  • Margaret Hargreaves
  • Jianguo Liu
  • Donna Kenerson
  • Rachel Neal
  • Zudi Takizala
  • Katina Beard
  • Helen Pinkerton
  • Marilyn Burress
  • Bill Blot
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10900-011-9498-8

Cite this article as:
Patel, K., Hargreaves, M., Liu, J. et al. J Community Health (2012) 37: 673. doi:10.1007/s10900-011-9498-8

Abstract

This study examined demographic and lifestyle factors that influenced decisions and obstacles to being screened for colorectal cancer in low-income African Americans in three urban Tennessee cities. As part of the Meharry Community Networks Program (CNP) needs assessment, a 123-item community survey was administered to assess demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and screening practices for various cancers in low-income African Americans. For this study, only African Americans 50 years and older (n = 460) were selected from the Meharry CNP community survey database. There were several predictors of colorectal cancer screening such as being married and having health insurance (P < .05). Additionally, there were associations between obstacles to screening and geographic region such as transportation and health insurance (P < .05). Educational interventions aimed at improving colorectal cancer knowledge and screening rates should incorporate information about obstacles and predictors to screening.

Keywords

Health disparities Colorectal cancer African Americans Cancer screening 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kushal Patel
    • 1
  • Margaret Hargreaves
    • 1
  • Jianguo Liu
    • 1
  • Donna Kenerson
    • 1
  • Rachel Neal
    • 1
  • Zudi Takizala
    • 1
  • Katina Beard
    • 2
  • Helen Pinkerton
    • 3
  • Marilyn Burress
    • 4
  • Bill Blot
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, School of MedicineMeharry Medical CollegeNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Matthew Walker Comprehensive Health CenterNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Southside/Dodson Avenue Community Health CenterChattanoogaUSA
  4. 4.Memphis Health CenterMemphisUSA
  5. 5.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  6. 6.International Epidemiology InstituteRockvilleUSA

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