Gambling Participation, Expenditure and Risk of Harm in Australia, 1997–1998 and 2010–2011

  • Andrew Richard Armstrong
  • Anna Thomas
  • Max Abbott
Original Paper

Abstract

Gambling-related harm results primarily from financial losses. Internationally Australia continues to rank as the largest spending nation per capita on gambling products. This would suggest that Australian gamblers are at disproportionately high risk of harm despite almost two decades of industry scrutiny and regulation, and investment in research, treatment and education programs. However, declines in participation rates, per capita expenditure, household expenditure, national disposable income spent on gambling and problem gambling rates have been cited as evidence that fewer people are gambling, that gamblers are spending less, and that gambling safety in Australia has improved. The current study investigated these propositions using national population and accounts data, and statistics from Australia’s two population-representative gambling surveys conducted in 1997–1998 and 2010–2011. Despite a falling participation rate the study found no real change in the number of people gambling overall, and increasing numbers consuming casino table games, race wagering and sports betting. Further found were increases rather than decreases in average gambler expenditure, overall, and across most products, particularly electronic gaming machines (EGMs). Potentially risky levels of average expenditure were observed in both periods, overall and for race wagering, casino table gaming, and EGMs. Changes in the proportion of income spent on gambling suggest risks declined overall and for race wagering and casino table gaming, but increased for EGMs. Finally, while problem gambling statistics were not comparable between periods, the study found double the number of moderate risk gamblers previously estimated for 2010–2011 amongst the 2 million Australians found to have experienced one or more gambling-related problems. The findings have implications for public health policy and resourcing, and the way in which prevalence and expenditure statistics have been interpreted by researchers, government and industry in Australia and elsewhere.

Keywords

Expenditure Participation Prevalence Problem gambling PGSI Australia Adaptation Harm minimisation Policy Public health Government EGM Gaming machine Sports betting Horse racing Casino 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Richard Armstrong
    • 1
  • Anna Thomas
    • 1
  • Max Abbott
    • 2
  1. 1.Australian Gambling Research CentreAustralian Institute of Family StudiesMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Auckland University of TechnologyAucklandNew Zealand

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