Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 295–297 | Cite as

Pathological Gambling Induced by Dopamine Antagonists: A Case Report

  • Philipp Grötsch
  • Claudia Lange
  • Gerhard A. Wiesbeck
  • Undine Lang
Original Paper

Abstract

Pathological gambling is defined as inappropriate, persistent, and maladaptive gambling behaviour. It is a non-pharmacological addiction classified as an impulse control disorder. However, pathological gambling has been associated with dopamine agonist use. Here we report of a 28-year-old man with a first major depressive episode and a post-traumatic stress disorder who has been treated with a combination of the serotonine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine and the tricyclic antidepressant maprotiline. The administration of antipsychotic flupentixole (up to 7 mg) turned this slight online poker gambler into an excessive gambler. Only after the discontinuation of the antidopaminergic agents and the switch to bupropion did this gambling behaviour stop which suggests a causal relationship between dopamine antagonists and pathological gambling.

Keywords

Antipsychotic agents Gambling behaviour Dopamine antagonists 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philipp Grötsch
    • 1
  • Claudia Lange
    • 1
  • Gerhard A. Wiesbeck
    • 1
  • Undine Lang
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychiatric Hospital of the University of BaselBaselSwitzerland

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