Journal of Genetic Counseling

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 868–879 | Cite as

2013 Review and Update of the Genetic Counseling Practice Based Competencies by a Task Force of the Accreditation Council for Genetic Counseling

  • Debra Lochner Doyle
  • Rawan I. Awwad
  • Jehannine C. Austin
  • Bonnie J. Baty
  • Amanda L. Bergner
  • Stephanie J. Brewster
  • Lori A. H. Erby
  • Cathi Rubin Franklin
  • Anne E. Greb
  • Robin E. Grubs
  • Gillian W. Hooker
  • Sarah Jane Noblin
  • Kelly E. Ormond
  • Christina G. Palmer
  • Elizabeth M. Petty
  • Claire N. Singletary
  • Matthew J. Thomas
  • Helga Toriello
  • Carol S. Walton
  • Wendy R. Uhlmann
Professional Issues

Abstract

The first practice based competencies (PBCs) for the field of genetic counseling were adopted by the American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC), 1996. Since that time, there has been significant growth in established and new work settings (clinical and non-clinical) and changes in service delivery models and the roles of genetic counselors. These changes prompted the ABGC to appoint a PBC Task Force in 2011 to review the PBCs with respect to their current relevance and to revise and update them as necessary. There are four domains in the revised PBCs: (I) Genetics Expertise and Analysis (II) Interpersonal, Psychosocial and Counseling Skills (III) Education and (IV) Professional Development and Practice. There are 22 competencies, each clarified with learning objectives or samples of activities and skills; a glossary is included. New competencies were added that address genomics, genetic testing and genetic counselors’ roles in risk assessment, education, supervision, conducting research and presenting research options to patients. With PBCs serving as the pre-defined abilities or outcomes of training, graduating genetic counselors will be well prepared to enter the field with a minimum level of skills and abilities. A description of the Task Force’s work, key changes and the 2013 PBCs are presented herein.

Keywords

Genetic counseling Practice based competencies (PBCs) Graduate program accreditation Genetic counselors Training Curriculum 

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Copyright information

© National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Debra Lochner Doyle
    • 1
  • Rawan I. Awwad
    • 2
  • Jehannine C. Austin
    • 3
    • 4
  • Bonnie J. Baty
    • 5
  • Amanda L. Bergner
    • 6
  • Stephanie J. Brewster
    • 7
  • Lori A. H. Erby
    • 8
    • 9
  • Cathi Rubin Franklin
    • 10
  • Anne E. Greb
    • 11
  • Robin E. Grubs
    • 12
  • Gillian W. Hooker
    • 13
  • Sarah Jane Noblin
    • 14
    • 15
  • Kelly E. Ormond
    • 16
  • Christina G. Palmer
    • 17
  • Elizabeth M. Petty
    • 18
  • Claire N. Singletary
    • 19
  • Matthew J. Thomas
    • 20
  • Helga Toriello
    • 21
  • Carol S. Walton
    • 22
  • Wendy R. Uhlmann
    • 23
    • 24
  1. 1.Screening and Genetics Unit, Washington State Department of HealthKentUSA
  2. 2.Counsyl Inc.South San FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  6. 6.Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  7. 7.Translational Neuroscience CenterBoston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  8. 8.Health, Behavior and SocietyThe Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Social and Behavioral Research BranchThe National Human Genome Research InstituteBethesdaUSA
  10. 10.Quest Diagnostics Inc.ValenciaUSA
  11. 11.Joan H. Marks Graduate Program in Human GeneticsSarah Lawrence CollegeBronxvilleUSA
  12. 12.Department of Human GeneticsUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  13. 13.NextGxDx, IncFranklinUSA
  14. 14.Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive ServicesUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  15. 15.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  16. 16.Department of GeneticsStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  17. 17.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  18. 18.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA
  19. 19.Department of Pediatrics and Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive ServicesUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA
  20. 20.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Virginia Health SystemCharlottesvilleUSA
  21. 21.Spectrum HealthGrand RapidsUSA
  22. 22.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineAuroraUSA
  23. 23.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  24. 24.Department of Human GeneticsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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