Journal of Genetic Counseling

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 476–485

Acceptability of Prenatal Diagnosis by a Sample of Parents of Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Cameroon (Sub-Saharan Africa)

  • Ambroise Wonkam
  • Alfred K. Njamnshi
  • Dora Mbanya
  • Jeanne Ngogang
  • Caryl Zameyo
  • Fru F. AngwafoIII
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10897-011-9372-y

Cite this article as:
Wonkam, A., Njamnshi, A.K., Mbanya, D. et al. J Genet Counsel (2011) 20: 476. doi:10.1007/s10897-011-9372-y

Abstract

Little is known about attitudes of parents of Sickle Cell Anemia patients in sub-Saharan Africa regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis and termination of an affected pregnancy. In this study, structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with a sample of 130 parents in Cameroon that had at least one living child with Sickle Cell Anemia. The majority of participants lived in urban areas (89%), were female (80%), Christian (93%), married (60.2%) in monogamous households (81.1%), were employed (61.7%), and had at least a secondary or tertiary education (82%). The majority of parents accepted the principle of prenatal genetic diagnosis for Sickle Cell Anemia (89.8%) and termination of pregnancy (62.5%). Acceptance of the principle of pregnancy termination increased with unemployment (p < .01) and single marital status (p < .05). The results of this study suggest Cameroonian parents with children affected with Sickle Cell Anemia generally accept the principles of prenatal diagnosis and in some cases termination of a pregnancy affected with Sickle Cell Anemia. Additional findings, policy and practice implications, and research recommendations are presented.

Keyword

Sickle Cell Anemia Prenatal genetic diagnosis Africa Cameroon Pregnancy termination Genetic counseling Parent attitudes 

Copyright information

© National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ambroise Wonkam
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alfred K. Njamnshi
    • 1
  • Dora Mbanya
    • 1
  • Jeanne Ngogang
    • 1
  • Caryl Zameyo
    • 1
  • Fru F. AngwafoIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Yaoundé IYaoundéCameroon
  2. 2.Division of Human Genetics, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of Cape Town (UCT)Cape TownSouth Africa

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