Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 25, Issue 7, pp 627–637

Exposure to Interparental Violence and Childhood Physical and Emotional Abuse as Related to Physical Aggression in Undergraduate Dating Relationships

  • Robert J. Milletich
  • Michelle L. Kelley
  • Ashley N. Doane
  • Matthew R. Pearson
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10896-010-9319-3

Cite this article as:
Milletich, R.J., Kelley, M.L., Doane, A.N. et al. J Fam Viol (2010) 25: 627. doi:10.1007/s10896-010-9319-3

Abstract

The present study examined whether witnessing interparental violence and experiencing childhood physical or emotional abuse were associated with college students’ perpetration of physical aggression and self-reports of victimization by their dating partners. Participants (183 males, 475 females) completed the Adult-Recall Version of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2-CA; Straus 2000), the Exposure to Abusive and Supportive Environments Parenting Inventory (EASE-PI; Nicholas and Bieber 1997), and the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2; Straus et al. 1996). Results of zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regressions demonstrated that being female and having experienced higher levels of childhood physical abuse were associated with having perpetrated physical aggression at least once. Among women, exposure to mother-to-father violence and childhood physical abuse were related to the extent of dating aggression. Among men, witnessing father-to-mother violence and childhood emotional abuse were associated with the extent of dating aggression. Witnessing interparental violence and experiencing childhood physical abuse increased the likelihood that women would report victimization, whereas childhood emotional abuse decreased the likelihood that respondents reported dating victimization. Viewing father-to-mother violence and experiencing childhood emotional abuse increased the extent that men reported being victimized by their dating partners, whereas witnessing mother-to-father violence and experiencing physical abuse decreased the extent that men reported being victimized by their dating partners. Results suggest the importance of parent and respondent gender on dating aggression.

Keywords

Interparental violence Childhood physical abuse Childhood emotional abuse Dating aggression 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Milletich
    • 1
  • Michelle L. Kelley
    • 1
  • Ashley N. Doane
    • 1
  • Matthew R. Pearson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA

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