Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 507–518 | Cite as

Intimate Partner Violence Victim and Perpetrator Characteristics Among Couples in the United States

  • Raul Caetano
  • Patrice A. C. Vaeth
  • Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler
Original article

Abstract

This paper describes the characteristics (sociodemographic, drinking and selected psychological attributes) of victims, perpetrators and those who engage in mutual intimate partner violence (IPV) among couples in the U.S. Subjects constitute a multistage area probability sample representative of married and cohabiting couples from the 48 contiguous United States. Results indicate that age is the only variable that appears to have a consistent effect for men and women and across violence-related statuses: Older individuals are less likely to be victims, perpetrators and less likely to be involved in mutually violent relationships. Other variables such as ethnicity, marital status, drinking, impulsivity, depression and powerlessness are either gender or status-specific in their ability to predict victimization, perpetration or victimization/perpetration. Overall, those involved in violent relationships do not appear to be very different from those not involved in violent relationships. The most likely reason for lack of this difference is the nature of IPV in general population samples, which is in most cases moderate.

Keywords

National sample Intimate partner violence Victimization Perpetration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raul Caetano
    • 1
  • Patrice A. C. Vaeth
    • 1
  • Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler
    • 1
  1. 1.Dallas Regional CampusUniversity of Texas Houston School of Public HealthDallasUSA

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