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Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 457–462 | Cite as

Gender-Role Implications on Same-Sex Intimate Partner Abuse

  • Carrie BrownEmail author
Original article

Abstract

This paper examines sociocultural factors that influence how same-sex intimate partner violence is viewed, studied, reported and treated, with a specific focus on the effects of gender-role socialization and heterosexism. Further it summarizes the similarities and differences experienced by heterosexual and same-sex couples in order to provide a framework for understanding the unique factors that must be considered when working with this population. It also explores how gender-role socializations and heterosexism create and enforce stigmas and obstacles for validation and reporting of this abuse. The exacerbation of same-sex partner abuse by the dominant and sexual minority culture is addressed and problems that exist within the legal system are highlighted. Issues created by the power dynamics of intersecting identities (race, socioeconomic status, age, disability, sexual orientation) and minority stress are discussed. Suggestions for supportive legislation and implications for helping professionals are provided.

Keywords

Intimate partner abuse/ violence Same-sex relationships Gender-roles Socialization Helping professionals Literature review 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Counseling PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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