Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 469–475

Factors Associated with Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victimization

  • Paul Schewe
  • Stephanie Riger
  • April Howard
  • Susan L. Staggs
  • Gillian E. Mason
Original Article

Abstract

This study explored factors associated with a lifetime history of domestic violence and sexual assault in a sample of welfare recipients in Illinois. Results indicate that childhood exposure to domestic violence is a risk factor for both sexual assault and domestic violence victimization, but that childhood physical abuse is only a risk factor for domestic violence. Increased education and employment skills and having more children were also risk factors for domestic violence victimization. Domestic violence was significantly associated with depression, while sexual assault was associated with low social support and a greater perceived need for mental health services. Frequent alcohol and drug use were not associated with either type of victimization. Research implications are discussed.

Keywords

Domestic violence Sexual assault Victimization Childhood exposure to violence 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Schewe
    • 1
  • Stephanie Riger
    • 1
  • April Howard
    • 1
  • Susan L. Staggs
    • 1
  • Gillian E. Mason
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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