Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp 486–495

Seasonal Changes in Undifilum Colonization and Swainsonine Content of Locoweeds

  • Jorge Achata Böttger
  • Rebecca Creamer
  • Dale Gardner
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10886-012-0120-z

Cite this article as:
Achata Böttger, J., Creamer, R. & Gardner, D. J Chem Ecol (2012) 38: 486. doi:10.1007/s10886-012-0120-z

Abstract

Locoweeds (Astragalus and Oxytropis) are leguminous plants that are toxic due to a symbiotic association with the endophytic fungus Undifilum oxytropis. The fungus produces the alkaloid swainsonine, an α-mannosidase-inhibitor that causes serious damage to mammals when consumed. A real-time PCR technique was developed to quantify the colonization extent of Undifilum in locoweeds and to compare it to the swainsonine concentration in the plants. Amplification of the endophyte nuclear ITS region allowed reliable quantification of Undifilum DNA from field plants and in vitro cultures. Swainsonine concentration was highly correlated (ρ = 0.972, P < 0.001) with the proportion of Undifilum DNA during the first 4 weeks of in vitro culture growth. Species of Astragalus and Oxytropis were sampled seasonally in New Mexico and Colorado for two years. High swainsonine concentration in plant samples was associated with high levels of endophyte DNA, except in plant reproductive tissues.

Keywords

Undifilum Quantitative PCR Swainsonine 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge Achata Böttger
    • 1
  • Rebecca Creamer
    • 1
  • Dale Gardner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed ScienceNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA
  2. 2.Poisonous Plant Research LabUSDA ARSLoganUSA

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