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Early Intervention for Repetitive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder: a Conceptual Model

  • Tracy J. Raulston
  • Wendy Machalicek
REVIEW ARTICLE

Abstract

This paper presents a conceptual model to improve the early intervention of repetitive behavior in infants and young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We include (a) a description of the trajectory of repetitive behavior in typical and atypical development and an explanation of its relation to screening and assessment and (b) a selective review of the intervention literature for rigid and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests (RRBIs) in infants and young children with ASD. These two sets of literature are used to build the rationale for a conceptual model to improve early developmentally appropriate intervention for RRBIs in ASD. The conceptual model posits that (a) increased sensitivity of measurement tools will allow for proper identification of when intervention is warranted and (b) increased research on focused interventions and dissemination of teaching protocols will improve the comprehensiveness of developmentally appropriate intervention. Finally, other areas for future research are highlighted.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Repetitive behavior Restricted interests and activities Stereotypy Early intervention Young children 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The first author received funding through the Engaging New Leaders in Implementation Science Training (ENLIST) Leadership Grant of the United States Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP).

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

No informed consent was necessary as no human subject data were directly gathered during preparation of this manuscript.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of OregonOregonUSA

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