Multisystemic Therapy Improves the Patient-Provider Relationship in Families of Adolescents with Poorly Controlled Insulin Dependent Diabetes

  • April Idalski Carcone
  • Deborah A. Ellis
  • Xinguang Chen
  • Sylvie Naar
  • Phillippe B. Cunningham
  • Kathleen Moltz
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if multisystemic therapy (MST), an intensive, home and community-based family treatment, significantly improved patient-provider relationships in families where youth had chronic poor glycemic control. One hundred forty-six adolescents with type 1 or 2 diabetes in chronic poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥8 %) and their primary caregivers were randomly assigned to MST or a telephone support condition. Caregiver perceptions of their relationship with the diabetes multidisciplinary medical team were assessed at baseline and treatment termination with the Measure of Process of Care-20. At treatment termination, MST families reported significant improvement on the Coordinated and Comprehensive Care scale and marginally significant improvement on the Respectful and Supportive Care scale. Improvements on the Enabling and Partnership and Providing Specific Information scales were not significant. Results suggest MST improves the ability of the families and the diabetes treatment providers to work together.

Keywords

Family therapy Health care services Diabetes Randomized controlled trial 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • April Idalski Carcone
    • 1
  • Deborah A. Ellis
    • 1
  • Xinguang Chen
    • 2
  • Sylvie Naar
    • 1
  • Phillippe B. Cunningham
    • 3
  • Kathleen Moltz
    • 4
  1. 1.Prevention Research Center, Department of PediatricsWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health & Health Professions and College of MedicineUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  4. 4.Division of Endocrinology, Department of PediatricsWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA

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