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Depression, Anxiety and Anger in Subtypes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients

  • Maria Rosaria A. Muscatello
  • Antonio Bruno
  • Gianluca Pandolfo
  • Umberto Micò
  • Simona Stilo
  • Mariagrazia Scaffidi
  • Pierluigi Consolo
  • Andrea Tortora
  • Socrate Pallio
  • Giuseppa Giacobbe
  • Luigi Familiari
  • Rocco ZoccaliEmail author
Article

Abstract

The present study aimed to elucidate the differences in depression, anxiety, anger, and quality of life in a sample of non-psychiatric IBS patients, starting from the hypothesis that IBS subtypes may have different symptomatic expressions of negative emotions with different outcomes on quality of life measures. Forty-two constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) subjects and 44 diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) subjects, after an examination by a gastroenterologist and a total colonoscopy, underwent a clinical interview and psychometric examination for the assessment of depression, anxiety, anger and quality of life. IBS subtypes showed different symptomatic profiles in depression, anxiety and anger, with C-IBS patients more psychologically distressed than D-IBS subjects. Affective and emotional symptoms should be considered as specific and integral to the syndrome, and recognizing the differences between IBS subtypes may have relevant implications for treatment options and clinical outcome.

Keywords

Irritable bowel syndrome Anxiety Depression Anger 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Rosaria A. Muscatello
    • 1
  • Antonio Bruno
    • 1
  • Gianluca Pandolfo
    • 1
  • Umberto Micò
    • 1
  • Simona Stilo
    • 1
  • Mariagrazia Scaffidi
    • 2
  • Pierluigi Consolo
    • 2
  • Andrea Tortora
    • 2
  • Socrate Pallio
    • 2
  • Giuseppa Giacobbe
    • 2
  • Luigi Familiari
    • 2
  • Rocco Zoccali
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric Sciences and AnaesthesiologyUniversity of MessinaMessinaItaly
  2. 2.Endoscopy Unit, Department of Medicine and PharmacologyUniversity of MessinaMessinaItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Scienze Psichiatriche ed AnestesiologichePoliclinico UniversitarioMessinaItaly

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