Do Coping Strategies Discriminate Eating Disordered Individuals Better Than Eating Disorder Features? An Explorative Study on Female Inpatients with Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa

  • Valentina Villa
  • Gian Mauro Manzoni
  • Francesco Pagnini
  • Gianluca Castelnuovo
  • Gian Luca Cesa
  • Enrico Molinari
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this explorative research was to examine how the COPE (Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced Inventory), an established instrument for measuring coping styles, and EDI-2 (Eating Disorder Inventory-2), a widely used questionnaire for assessing psychological and behavioural features of eating disorders (ED), discriminate among healthy individuals, inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and inpatients with bulimia nervosa (BN). A discriminant analysis approach was used. Results showed that coping styles such as positive attitude, planning and social support are even more discriminative variables than eating disorder features. Implications for further studies are discussed.

Keywords

Observational descriptive study Coping Eating disorders Anorexia nervosa Bulimia nervosa Discriminant analysis 

References

  1. Aime, A., Sabourin, S., & Ratte, C. (2006). The eating disturbed spectrum in relation with coping and interpersonal functioning. Eating and Weight Disorders, 11, 66–72.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. APA. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  3. Ball, K., & Lee, C. (2000). Relationships between psychological stress, coping and disordered eating: A review. Psychology and Health, 14, 1007–1035.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Ball, K., & Lee, C. (2002). Psychological stress, coping, and symptoms of disordered eating in a community sample of Australian women. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 31, 71–81.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Benyamini, Y. (2009). Stress and coping with women’s health issues: A review from a self-regulation perspective. European Psychologist, 14, 63–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bloks, H., Spinhoven, P., Callewaert, I., Willemse-Koning, C., & Turksma, A. (2001). Changes in coping styles and recovery after inpatient treatment for severe eating disorders. European Eating Disorders Review, 9, 397–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bloks, H., van Furth, E. F., Callewaert, I., & Hoek, H. W. (2004). Coping strategies and recovery in patients with a severe eating disorder. Eating Disorders, 12, 157–169.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Brytek, A. (2006). Self-esteem, strategies of coping and feeling of anger in French patients with anorexia nervosa. Psychiatria Polska, 40, 743–750.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Carver, C. S., Scheier, M. F., & Weintraub, J. K. (1989). Assessing coping strategies: A theoretically based approach. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 56, 267–283.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Conti, L. (2002). Repertorio delle scale di valutazione in psichiatria. Firenze, Italy: S.E.E.Google Scholar
  11. Faul, F., & Erdfelder, E. (1992). GPOWER: A priori, post-hoc and compromise power analysis for MS-DOS. Bonn: Bonn University, Department of Psychology.Google Scholar
  12. First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (2007). SCID-I Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Firenze: Giunti O.S. Organizzazioni Speciali.Google Scholar
  13. Folkman, S., & Moskowitz, J. T. (2004). COPING: Pitfalls and promise. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 745–774.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Garner, D. M. (1991). EDI-2. Eating Disorder Inventory 2. Professional manual. Odessa, FL: PAR-Psychological Assessment Resources.Google Scholar
  15. Ghaderi, A. (2001). Review of risk factors for eating disorders: Implications for primary prevention and cognitive behavioural therapy. Scandinavian Journal of Behaviour Therapy, 30, 57–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Ghaderi, A., & Scott, B. (2000). Coping in dieting and eating disorders: A population-based study. Journal of Nervous Mental Disease, 188, 273–279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Harvey, J. A., & Robinson, J. D. (2003). Eating disorders in men: Current considerations. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 10, 297–306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Janzen, B. L., Kelly, G. W., & Saklofske, D. H. (1992). Bulimic symptomatology and coping in a nonclinical sample. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 75, 395–399.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Marañón, I., Echeburúa, E., & Grijalvo, J. (2007). Are there more personality disorders in treatment-seeking patients with eating disorders than in other kind of psychiatric patients? A two control groups comparative study using the IPDE. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 7, 283–293.Google Scholar
  20. Nakahara, R., Yoshiuchi, K., Yamanaka, G., Sasaki, T., Suematsu, H., & Kuboki, T. (2000). Coping skills in Japanese women with eating disorders. Psychological Reports, 87, 741–746.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Overton, A., Selway, S., Strongman, K., & Houston, M. (2005). Eating disorders—The regulation of positive as well as negative emotion experience. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 12, 39–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Paxton, S. J., & Diggens, J. (1997). Avoidance coping, binge eating, and depression: An examination of the escape theory of binge eating. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 22, 83–87.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Soukup, V. M., Beiler, M. E., & Terrell, F. (1990). Stress, coping style, and problem solving ability among eating-disordered inpatients. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 46, 592–599.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Taylor, S. E., & Stanton, A. L. (2007). Coping resources, coping processes, and mental health. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 3, 377–401.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Troop, N. A., Holbrey, A., & Treasure, J. L. (1998). Stress, coping, and crisis support in eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 24, 157–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Troop, N. A., Holbrey, A., Trowler, R., & Treasure, J. L. (1994). Ways of coping in women with eating disorders. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 182, 535–540.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Troop, N. A., & Treasure, J. L. (1997). Psychosocial factors in the onset of eating disorders: Responses to life-events and difficulties. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 70, 373–385.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Vitousek, K. B., Daly, J., & Heiser, C. (1991). Reconstructing the internal world of the eating-disordered individual: Overcoming denial and distortion in self-report. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 10, 647–666.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Yager, J., Rorty, M., & Rossotto, E. (1995). Coping styles differ between recovered and nonrecovered women with bulimia nervosa, but not between recovered women and non-eating-disordered control subjects. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 183, 86–94.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valentina Villa
    • 1
  • Gian Mauro Manzoni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Francesco Pagnini
    • 2
  • Gianluca Castelnuovo
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gian Luca Cesa
    • 1
  • Enrico Molinari
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Psychology Research LaboratorySan Giuseppe Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCSPiancavalloItaly
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of BergamoBergamoItaly
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyCatholic University of MilanMilanItaly

Personalised recommendations