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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 79–87 | Cite as

Boosting Well-Being with Positive Psychology Interventions: Moderating Role of Personality and Other Factors

  • Weiting Ng
Original Paper

Abstract

Building on the empirical evidence that demonstrates that positive interventions successfully enhance well-being, this article examines the factors that would moderate their efficacy. First, it briefly discusses the theoretical and empirical support for the importance and benefits of well-being. Second, the article presents empirical evidence illustrating how positive interventions promote well-being and how they can be incorporated into traditional psychotherapy as a form of positive psychotherapy. Third, it examines the mechanisms that may undermine or improve the effectiveness of positive interventions. In addition to examining the factors that moderate the effects of positive interventions on enhancing happiness, the article focuses specifically on the moderating role of personality by exploring the personality-well-being associations. Finally, the article proposes strategies to counteract the attenuating moderating influences. The conclusion of the article suggests that it is important to customize positive psychology interventions for individuals to maximize their efficacy.

Keywords

Positive interventions Personality Moderating factors Boosting well-being 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Arts & Social SciencesSIM UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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