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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 365–374 | Cite as

Contemporary Psychotherapy: Moving Beyond a Therapeutic Dialogue

  • James C. Overholser
Article

Abstract

Psychotherapy was developed as a means of using words to heal emotional pain. Although a therapeutic dialogue can be helpful to many clients, some people need a more action-based intervention. Psychotherapy may be enhanced by adapting several therapeutic procedures that have been found effective in physical therapy. Where physical therapy can help clients learn to manage chronic physical pain, psychotherapy can help clients learn to manage chronic emotional pain. Both physical therapy and psychotherapy can help to facilitate awareness, flexibility, strength and endurance in order to maximize the client’s functional ability.

psychotherapy endurance strength flexibility 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCase Western Reserve UniversityCleveland

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