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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 311–330 | Cite as

Negative Treatment Effects in Dyadic Psychotherapy: A Focus on Prevention and Intervention Strategies

  • Susan A. NolanEmail author
  • Carla G. Strassle
  • Howard B. Roback
  • Jeffrey L. Binder
Article

Abstract

Therapy holds the potential to harm as well as help. This paper highlights approaches that may help prevent or decrease the incidence of negative effects in psychotherapy. These approaches include supervision, peer consultation, ongoing assessment of the therapeutic process, therapist-client matching, and referrals and transfers. We hope that this paper will serve as a stimulus for clinicians, psychotherapy researchers, and educators to put forth collabo-rative effort into identifying variables directly associated with adverse treat- ment outcomes and determining appropriate prevention and intervention strategies.

psychotherapy negative outcome treatment failure intervention prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan A. Nolan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Carla G. Strassle
    • 2
  • Howard B. Roback
    • 3
  • Jeffrey L. Binder
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySeton Hall UniversitySouth Orange
  2. 2.York College of PennsylvaniaUSA
  3. 3.Vanderbilt University School of MedicineUSA
  4. 4.George School of Psychology at Argosy University/AtlantaUSA

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