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Journal of Business and Psychology

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 621–635 | Cite as

The Dark Triad and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: the Moderating Role of High Involvement Management Climate

  • Brian D. WebsterEmail author
  • Mickey B. Smith
Original Paper

Abstract

The present study extends research related to the dark triad (DT) personality traits, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy, by demonstrating a managerial action that mitigates negative behaviors traditionally associated with the DT. Drawing from self-determination theory, we suggest that a high involvement management climate acts as an important boundary condition influencing the relationship between subordinate DT personality traits and subordinate organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). In a sample of 97 work groups, comprised of 298 employees, we find general support for our predictions that a high involvement management climate affects the rate at which Machiavellians and narcissists engage in OCB. Results from the present study are important for theory and practice alike because research has yet to identify actions managers can take to help combat detrimental effects of the DT in the workplace.

Keywords

Machiavellianism Narcissism Psychopathy High involvement management climate 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Management, Miller College of BusinessBall State UniversityMuncieUSA
  2. 2.Department of Management, Mitchell College of BusinessUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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