HR Interventions that Go Viral

  • Paul R. Yost
  • Jillian R. McLellan
  • Diana L. Ecker
  • Glenna C. Chang
  • Joy M. Hereford
  • Chris C. Roenicke
  • Jami B. Town
  • Yolanda L. Winberg
Article

Abstract

What causes one Human Resource (HR) intervention to thrive while another dies? The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of HR interventions that are not only self-sustaining, but adapt and gain momentum over time. Based on a review of the literature, a case study, and 16 critical incident interviews with senior Industrial-Organizational (I–O) and HR professionals, several characteristics of the organization, the intervention, and the leader consistently emerged as important in creating sustainable HR programs, suggesting several new directions for future research.

Keywords

Human resource practice Human resource alignment Human resource management Organizational change Innovation Adaptive capability Complexity leadership 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Yost
    • 1
  • Jillian R. McLellan
    • 1
  • Diana L. Ecker
    • 1
  • Glenna C. Chang
    • 1
  • Joy M. Hereford
    • 1
  • Chris C. Roenicke
    • 1
  • Jami B. Town
    • 1
  • Yolanda L. Winberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial-Organizational PsychologySeattle Pacific UniversitySeattleUSA

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