Daily self-weighing and weight gain prevention: a longitudinal study of college-aged women

  • Diane L. Rosenbaum
  • Hallie M. Espel
  • Meghan L. Butryn
  • Fengqing Zhang
  • Michael R. Lowe
BRIEF REPORT

Abstract

Daily self-weighing has been suggested as an important factor for weight loss maintenance among samples with obesity. This study is a secondary analysis that examined daily self-weighing in association with weight and body composition outcomes over 2 years among young women with vulnerability for weight gain. Women (N = 294) of varying weight status completed self-weighing frequency questionnaires and weight was measured in the clinic at baseline, 6 months, 1, and 2 years; DXA scans were completed at baseline, 6 months and 2 years. Multilevel models examined the relationship between daily self-weighing (at any point in the study) and trajectories of BMI and body fat percentage. Daily self-weighing was associated with significant declines in BMI and body fat percent over time. Future research is needed to examine causal relations between daily self-weighing and weight gain prevention. Nonetheless, these data extend the possibility that daily self-weighing may be important for prevention of unwanted weight gain.

Keywords

Self-weighing Weight change Body fat change Longitudinal Obesity prevention 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane L. Rosenbaum
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hallie M. Espel
    • 1
  • Meghan L. Butryn
    • 1
  • Fengqing Zhang
    • 1
  • Michael R. Lowe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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