Time to selected quit date and subsequent rates of sustained smoking abstinence

  • George L. Anesi
  • Scott D. Halpern
  • Michael O. Harhay
  • Kevin G. Volpp
  • Kathryn Saulsgiver
Article

Abstract

In efforts to combat tobacco dependence, most smoking cessation programs offer individuals who smoke the choice of a target quit date. However, it is uncertain whether the time to the selected quit date is associated with participants’ chances of achieving sustained abstinence. In a pre-specified secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of four financial-incentive programs or usual care to encourage smoking cessation (Halpern et al. in N Engl J Med 372(22):2108–2117, doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1414293, 2015), study participants were instructed to select a quit date between 0 and 90 days from enrollment. Among those who selected a quit date and provided complete baseline data (n = 1848), we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association of the time to the selected quit date with 6- and 12-month biochemically-confirmed abstinence rates. In the fully adjusted model, the probability of being abstinent at 6 months if the participant selected a quit date in weeks 1, 5, 10, and 13 were 39.6, 22.6, 10.9, and 4.3%, respectively.

Keywords

Tobacco dependence Smoking cessation Quit date Sustained abstinence Stage-of-change Readiness-to-quit 

Supplementary material

10865_2017_9868_MOESM1_ESM.doc (64 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 64 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • George L. Anesi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Scott D. Halpern
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Michael O. Harhay
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Kevin G. Volpp
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Kathryn Saulsgiver
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical CareHospital of the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and InformaticsPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Leonard Davis Institute of Health EconomicsUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicinePerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Center for Health Equity Research and PromotionPhiladelphia Veterans Affairs Medical CenterPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.Department of Health Care Management, Wharton SchoolUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations