Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 591–602

Therapeutic mechanisms of a mindfulness-based treatment for IBS: effects on visceral sensitivity, catastrophizing, and affective processing of pain sensations

  • Eric L. Garland
  • Susan A. Gaylord
  • Olafur Palsson
  • Keturah Faurot
  • J. Douglas Mann
  • William E. Whitehead
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10865-011-9391-z

Cite this article as:
Garland, E.L., Gaylord, S.A., Palsson, O. et al. J Behav Med (2012) 35: 591. doi:10.1007/s10865-011-9391-z

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional disorder characterized by abdominal pain and hypervigilance to gastrointestinal sensations. We hypothesized that mindfulness training (MT), which promotes nonreactive awareness of emotional and sensory experience, may target underlying mechanisms of IBS including affective pain processing and catastrophic appraisals of gastrointestinal sensations. Seventy five female IBS patients were randomly assigned to participate in either 8 weeks of MT or a social support group. A theoretically grounded, multivariate path model tested therapeutic mediators of the effect of MT on IBS severity and quality of life. Results suggest that MT exerts significant therapeutic effects on IBS symptoms by promoting nonreactivity to gut-focused anxiety and catastrophic appraisals of the significance of abdominal sensations coupled with a refocusing of attention onto interoceptive data with less emotional interference. Hence, MT appears to target and ameliorate the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of IBS.

Keywords

Mindfulness Irritable bowel syndrome Pain Therapeutic mechanisms Path analysis Interoception 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric L. Garland
    • 1
  • Susan A. Gaylord
    • 2
  • Olafur Palsson
    • 3
  • Keturah Faurot
    • 2
  • J. Douglas Mann
    • 4
  • William E. Whitehead
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Social Work, Trinity Institute for the AddictionsFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  2. 2.Program on Integrative Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of MedicineThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medicine, Center for Functional Gastrointestinal and Motility Disorders and Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, School of MedicineThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Department of Neurology, School of MedicineThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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