Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 244–253 | Cite as

Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence

  • Christianne L. Roumie
  • Robert Greevy
  • Kenneth A. Wallston
  • Tom A. Elasy
  • Lisa Kaltenbach
  • Kristen Kotter
  • Robert S. Dittus
  • Theodore Speroff
Article

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient’s antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

Keywords

Medication adherence Hypertension Patient centered care Communication 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This material is based upon work supported by the Veterans Affairs Clinical Research Center of Excellence and the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville Tennessee. VA Career Development Transition Award 04-342-2.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest to disclose. The principal investigators and co-investigators had full access to the data and were responsible for the study protocol, statistical analysis plan, progress of the study, analysis, reporting of the study and the decision to publish.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christianne L. Roumie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 10
  • Robert Greevy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • Kenneth A. Wallston
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  • Tom A. Elasy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  • Lisa Kaltenbach
    • 8
  • Kristen Kotter
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • Robert S. Dittus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  • Theodore Speroff
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 9
  1. 1.VA Tennessee Valley HealthcareTennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC)NashvilleUSA
  2. 2.HSR&D Targeted Research Enhancement Program Center for Patient Healthcare BehaviorNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Tennessee Valley VA Clinical Research Training Center of Excellence (CRCoE)NashvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicineVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  5. 5.VA National Quality Scholars ProgramNashvilleUSA
  6. 6.Department of BiostatisticsVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  7. 7.School of NursingVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  8. 8.Duke Clinical Research InstituteDurhamUSA
  9. 9.Department of Preventive MedicineVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  10. 10.Nashville VA Medical CenterNashvilleUSA

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