Journal of Behavioral Education

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 34–57

An Evaluation of a Classwide Intervention Package Involving Self-Management and a Group Contingency on Classroom Behavior of Middle School Students

  • Sandra M. Chafouleas
  • Lisa M. Hagermoser Sanetti
  • Rose Jaffery
  • Lindsay M. Fallon
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10864-011-9135-8

Cite this article as:
Chafouleas, S.M., Hagermoser Sanetti, L.M., Jaffery, R. et al. J Behav Educ (2012) 21: 34. doi:10.1007/s10864-011-9135-8
  • 906 Downloads

Abstract

The effectiveness of an intervention package involving self-management and a group contingency at increasing appropriate classroom behaviors was evaluated in a sample of middle school students. Participants included all students in each of the 3 eighth-grade general education classrooms and their teachers. The intervention package included strategies recommended as part of best practice in classroom management to involve both building skill (self-management) and reinforcing appropriate behavior (group contingency). Data sources involved assessment of targeted behaviors using Direct Behavior Rating—single item scales completed by students and systematic direct observations completed by external observers. Outcomes suggested that, on average, student behavior moderately improved during intervention as compared to baseline when examining observational data for off-task behavior. Results for Direct Behavior Rating data were not as pronounced across all targets and classrooms in suggesting improvement for students. Limitations and future directions, along with implications for school-based practitioners working in middle school general education settings, are discussed.

Keywords

Self-management Group contingency Middle school Behavior assessment Classwide intervention 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra M. Chafouleas
    • 1
  • Lisa M. Hagermoser Sanetti
    • 1
  • Rose Jaffery
    • 1
  • Lindsay M. Fallon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

Personalised recommendations