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Journal of Behavioral Education

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 93–109 | Cite as

Evaluation of a Video Prompting and Fading Procedure for Teaching Dish Washing Skills to Adults with Developmental Disabilities

  • Jeff SigafoosEmail author
  • Mark O’Reilly
  • Helen Cannella
  • Chaturi Edrisinha
  • Berenice de la Cruz
  • Megha Upadhyaya
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
  • Anna Hundley
  • Alonzo Andrews
  • Carolyn Garver
  • David Young
Article

We evaluated a video prompting and fading procedure for teaching three adults with developmental disabilities to wash dishes. Video prompting involved showing video clips depicting each step of the task. All three adults reached 90–100% correct when video prompting was implemented. Following acquisition, video prompting was withdrawn, but performance deteriorated. Subsequently, a 3-step fading procedure was implemented in which the separate video clips were merged to form larger, multi-step segments of video. Performance reached 80–100% correct as the video prompts were re-applied and then faded. Performance decreased at the 3-month follow-up when prompting was removed, but stabilized at 80–90% correct when the third step in the fading sequence was reinstated. These data suggest a promising approach for fading video prompts.

KEY WORDS:

video prompting prompt fading daily living skills adults developmental disabilities 

Notes

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Preparation of this manuscript was supported by a grant from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission [CAT-D (Computer Accommodations for Texans with Disabilities) Grant Project]. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the granting agency.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeff Sigafoos
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mark O’Reilly
    • 2
  • Helen Cannella
    • 3
  • Chaturi Edrisinha
    • 2
  • Berenice de la Cruz
    • 2
  • Megha Upadhyaya
    • 2
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 4
  • Anna Hundley
    • 5
  • Alonzo Andrews
    • 5
  • Carolyn Garver
    • 5
  • David Young
    • 5
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia
  2. 2.The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.University of BariBariItaly
  5. 5.Autism Treatment Center of TexasDallas and San AntonioUSA

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