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Journal of Behavioral Education

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 189–201 | Cite as

Computer-Presented Video Prompting for Teaching Microwave Oven Use to Three Adults with Developmental Disabilities

  • Jeff Sigafoos
  • Mark O’Reilly
  • Helen Cannella
  • Megha Upadhyaya
  • Chaturi Edrisinha
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
  • Anna Hundley
  • Alonzo Andrews
  • Carolyn Garver
  • David Young
Article

Abstract

We evaluated the use of a video prompting procedure for teaching three adults with developmental disabilities to make popcorn using a microwave oven. Training, using a 10-step task analysis, was conducted in the kitchen of the participant’s vocational training program. During baseline, participants were instructed to make popcorn, but were given no further instructions or prompts. Video prompting consisted of first watching a video clip of a step being performed and then giving participants the opportunity to imitate that step. This prompting procedure was introduced in a delayed multiple-probe across subjects design. Following acquisition, video prompting was removed and maintenance in the absence of video prompting was assessed at 2, 6, and 10 weeks. Two of the three participants acquired the task when video prompting was introduced and performed at 80–100% correct during follow-up sessions. These data suggest that video prompting may be an effective instructional strategy for teaching daily living skills to adults with developmental disabilities.

Keywords

video prompting daily living skills developmental disabilities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeff Sigafoos
    • 1
    • 4
  • Mark O’Reilly
    • 1
  • Helen Cannella
    • 1
  • Megha Upadhyaya
    • 1
  • Chaturi Edrisinha
    • 1
  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 2
  • Anna Hundley
    • 3
  • Alonzo Andrews
    • 3
  • Carolyn Garver
    • 3
  • David Young
    • 3
  1. 1.The University of Texas at AustinU.S.A.
  2. 2.University of BariItaly
  3. 3.Autism Treatment Center of TexasDallas and San Antonio
  4. 4.School of EducationThe University of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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