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Syndromes of Self-Reported Psychopathology for Ages 18–59 in 29 Societies

  • Masha Y. IvanovaEmail author
  • Thomas M. Achenbach
  • Leslie A. Rescorla
  • Lori V. Turner
  • Adelina Ahmeti-Pronaj
  • Alma Au
  • Carmen Avila Maese
  • Monica Bellina
  • J. Carlos Caldas
  • Yi-Chuen Chen
  • Ladislav Csemy
  • Marina M. da Rocha
  • Jeroen Decoster
  • Anca Dobrean
  • Lourdes Ezpeleta
  • Johnny R. J. Fontaine
  • Yasuko Funabiki
  • Halldór S. Guðmundsson
  • Valerie S. Harder
  • Marie Leiner de la Cabada
  • Patrick Leung
  • Jianghong Liu
  • Safia Mahr
  • Sergey Malykh
  • Jelena Srdanovic Maras
  • Jasminka Markovic
  • David M. Ndetei
  • Kyung Ja Oh
  • Jean-Michel Petot
  • Geylan Riad
  • Direnc Sakarya
  • Virginia C. Samaniego
  • Sandra Sebre
  • Mimoza Shahini
  • Edwiges Silvares
  • Roma Simulioniene
  • Elvisa Sokoli
  • Joel B. Talcott
  • Natalia Vazquez
  • Ewa Zasepa
Article

Abstract

This study tested the multi-society generalizability of an eight-syndrome assessment model derived from factor analyses of American adults’ self-ratings of 120 behavioral, emotional, and social problems. The Adult Self-Report (ASR; Achenbach and Rescorla 2003) was completed by 17,152 18–59-year-olds in 29 societies. Confirmatory factor analyses tested the fit of self-ratings in each sample to the eight-syndrome model. The primary model fit index (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation) showed good model fit for all samples, while secondary indices showed acceptable to good fit. Only 5 (0.06%) of the 8,598 estimated parameters were outside the admissible parameter space. Confidence intervals indicated that sampling fluctuations could account for the deviant parameters. Results thus supported the tested model in societies differing widely in social, political, and economic systems, languages, ethnicities, religions, and geographical regions. Although other items, societies, and analytic methods might yield different results, the findings indicate that adults in very diverse societies were willing and able to rate themselves on the same standardized set of 120 problem items. Moreover, their self-ratings fit an eight-syndrome model previously derived from self-ratings by American adults. The support for the statistically derived syndrome model is consistent with previous findings for parent, teacher, and self-ratings of 1½–18-year-olds in many societies. The ASR and its parallel collateral-report instrument, the Adult Behavior Checklist (ABCL), may offer mental health professionals practical tools for the multi-informant assessment of clinical constructs of adult psychopathology that appear to be meaningful across diverse societies.

Keywords

Psychopathology Adult self-report Syndromes Cross-cultural International 

Notes

Conflict of Interest

Drs. Ivanova, Achenbach, and Turner are employed by the Research Center for Children, Youth, and Families which publishes the ASR.

Experiment Participants

In each society, conventions for obtaining informed consent required by the investigator’s institution were followed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masha Y. Ivanova
    • 1
    Email author
  • Thomas M. Achenbach
    • 1
  • Leslie A. Rescorla
    • 2
  • Lori V. Turner
    • 1
  • Adelina Ahmeti-Pronaj
    • 3
  • Alma Au
    • 4
  • Carmen Avila Maese
    • 5
  • Monica Bellina
    • 6
  • J. Carlos Caldas
    • 7
  • Yi-Chuen Chen
    • 8
  • Ladislav Csemy
    • 9
  • Marina M. da Rocha
    • 10
  • Jeroen Decoster
    • 11
  • Anca Dobrean
    • 12
  • Lourdes Ezpeleta
    • 13
  • Johnny R. J. Fontaine
    • 11
  • Yasuko Funabiki
    • 14
  • Halldór S. Guðmundsson
    • 15
  • Valerie S. Harder
    • 1
  • Marie Leiner de la Cabada
    • 16
  • Patrick Leung
    • 17
  • Jianghong Liu
    • 18
  • Safia Mahr
    • 19
  • Sergey Malykh
    • 20
  • Jelena Srdanovic Maras
    • 21
  • Jasminka Markovic
    • 22
  • David M. Ndetei
    • 24
  • Kyung Ja Oh
    • 23
  • Jean-Michel Petot
    • 25
  • Geylan Riad
    • 26
  • Direnc Sakarya
    • 27
  • Virginia C. Samaniego
    • 28
  • Sandra Sebre
    • 29
  • Mimoza Shahini
    • 3
  • Edwiges Silvares
    • 30
  • Roma Simulioniene
    • 31
  • Elvisa Sokoli
    • 32
  • Joel B. Talcott
    • 33
  • Natalia Vazquez
    • 34
  • Ewa Zasepa
    • 35
  1. 1.University of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBryn Mawr CollegeBryn MawrUSA
  3. 3.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryUniversity Clinical Center of KosovaPrishtineKosovo
  4. 4.Department of Applied Social SciencesHong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina
  5. 5.Cd. JuárezMexico
  6. 6.Department of Child PsychiatryEugenio Medea Scientific InstituteBosisio PariniItaly
  7. 7.Departamento de Ciências Sociais e do ComportamentoInstituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde - NorteGandraPortugal
  8. 8.Department of PsychologyNational Chung Cheng UniversityChia-YiTaiwan
  9. 9.Prague Psychiatric Centre, Laboratory of Social PsychiatryPragueCzech Republic
  10. 10.Institute of Human SciencesUniversity Paulista (Unip)São PauloBrazil
  11. 11.Department of Personnel Management, Work, and Organizational PsychologyGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  12. 12.Department of Clinical Psychology and PsychotherapyBabes-Bolyai UniversityCluj NapocaRomania
  13. 13.Departament de Psicologia Clinica i de la Salut, Edifici BUniversitat Autonoma de BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  14. 14.Department of PsychiatryKyoto University HospitalSakyo-kuJapan
  15. 15.Faculty of Social WorkUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland
  16. 16.Department of PediatricsTexas Tech University Health Sciences CenterLubbockUSA
  17. 17.Department of PsychologyThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongPeople’s Republic of China
  18. 18.School of Nursing and MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  19. 19.Departement de Psychologie, Laboratoire EVACLIPSYUniversité Paris Ouest Nanterre la DéfenseNanterreFrance
  20. 20.Psychological Institute of Russian Academy of EducationMoscowRussia
  21. 21.Clinical Center of VojvodinaNovi SadSerbia
  22. 22.Medical Faculty Novi Sad, Clinical Center of VojvodinaUniversity of Novi SadNovi SadSerbia
  23. 23.Africa Mental Health FoundationNairobiKenya
  24. 24.Department of PsychologyYonsei UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  25. 25.Departement de Psychologie, Laboratoire EVACLIPSYUniversité de Paris OuestNanterreFrance
  26. 26.Helwan UniversityCairoEgypt
  27. 27.Department of PsychiatryAnkara University Faculty of MedicineAnkaraTurkey
  28. 28.Pontificia Universidad Católica ArgentinaBuenos AiresArgentina
  29. 29.Department of PsychologyUniversity of LatviaRigaLatvia
  30. 30.Instituto de PsicologiaUniversity of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  31. 31.Department of PsychologyKlaipeda UniversityKlaipedaLithuania
  32. 32.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TiranaTiranaAlbania
  33. 33.Aston Brain Centre, School of Life and Health SciencesAston UniversityBirminghamUK
  34. 34.Pontificia Universidad Católica ArgentinaBuenos AiresArgentina
  35. 35.The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special EducationWarsawPoland

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