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Influences of Comorbid Disorders on Personality Assessment Inventory Profiles in Women with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

  • Pamela Drury
  • Patrick S. CalhounEmail author
  • Christina Boggs
  • Gustavo Araujo
  • Michelle F. Dennis
  • Jean C. Beckham
Article

Abstract

The present study describes Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) profiles for women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Four groups of women were sampled: single Axis I diagnosis of PTSD; PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD); PTSD, MDD, at least one other Axis I disorder; and controls with no Axis I disorder. Higher comorbidity rates were associated with higher mean profile elevations and broader range of endorsed symptoms. The group with the highest rate of comorbidity produced profiles most similar to previously published reports of patients with PTSD. This is in contrast to women with a single diagnosis of PTSD, who produced relative mean elevations only on subscales measuring distress caused by trauma and physiological symptoms of depression. Thus, published profiles may be more reflective of PTSD with comorbidity than a single diagnosis of PTSD.

Keywords

PTSD Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) Psychological assessment Women 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela Drury
    • 1
  • Patrick S. Calhoun
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Christina Boggs
    • 3
    • 4
  • Gustavo Araujo
    • 2
  • Michelle F. Dennis
    • 2
  • Jean C. Beckham
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Durham Veterans Affairs Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.VA Mid-Atlantic Region Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC)DurhamUSA
  4. 4.James A. Haley Veterans Affairs Medical CenterTampaUSA

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